“Town and Country Traffic, red and white Skyhawk, 4-mile final, Runway One Seven, Town and Country.”

“Town and Country Traffic, blue and white Warrior, turning base, Runway One Seven, Town and Country.”

“Town and Country Traffic, red and white Skyhawk, final, Runway One Seven, Town and Country.”

redAndWhiteCallsign

Do you think saying your aircraft’s color scheme in place of your aircraft’s registration when making position reports is a great idea? The truth is, this tactic has the potential to get you into deep serious trouble. I’ll explain why in this week’s show.

How to Get in Touch with ATC for VFR Flight Following

I’ve covered this topic before, but several pilots have asked me about it in the last month. A refresher, with all the radio work, coming right up.

A Good Read for IFR Pilots

My friend and highly experienced pilot, Sarah Fritts of ThinkAviation.net just published a Kindle book called

The Instrument Pilot’s Survival Guide.*

This guide will help you alleviate your stress by teaching you the general flow of an instrument flight.

Mastering the rhythm of an instrument flight is the key to a worry-free experience.

This survival guide will walk you through an instrument flight from beginning to end. Each step along the way, this book will teach you what you should do every time. Sarah Fritts

More details about the book coming up at my other website, IFRflightRadio.com.
 
 
*The fine print: If you make a purchase at Amazon.com using this link, I receive a small commission.

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If you’re using your aircraft model and color scheme to identify yourself in an uncontrolled airport pattern, I have a good reason to quit immediately. Let’s talk about that reason in the next edition of the Radar Contact Show.

It’s been awhile since we talked about how to make initial contact with ATC when requesting VFR flight following. I’ve had some interesting comments and suggestions from pilots and flight instructors. We’ll hash it out in the next edition of the Radar Contact Show.

In the meantime, here’s a good read for IFR pilots. My friend and highly experienced pilot, Sarah Fritts of ThinkAviation.net just published a Kindle book called

The Instrument Pilot’s Survival Guide.*

If you buy the book by Friday, April 22, you can get it for only $0.99. Sarah tells me the price will increase to $3.99 over the weekend and then $8.99 on Monday, April 25. Secure your copy at Amazon.com* before the price goes up. I’ll have more details about her book in the next show.


 
 
*The fine print: If you make a purchase at Amazon.com using this link, I receive a small commission.

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Common Traffic Advisory Frequencies and ATC as Customer Service

April 10, 2016

This edition of the Radar Contact Show consolidates the previous 3 articles about using a Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) and about ATC as customer service organization. If you would rather read about CTAF, you can find the full articles using these links. How to Select and Use the Correct Common Traffic Advisory Frequency It’s […]

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It’s What You Don’t Hear on the Radio that Can Get You

April 7, 2016

In the past I’ve talked about the importance of listening to the aircraft radio to build situational awareness. Nowhere is this more important than in an uncontrolled airport traffic pattern. Here’s an example radio call you might hear in an uncontrolled pattern. “Town and Country Traffic, Piper 525 Yankee Golf, four mile straight-in, Runway 17, […]

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How to Select and Use the Correct Common Traffic Advisory Frequency

April 5, 2016

A pilot named Michael recently wrote to me with this question about the use of a Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF). “I have a question regarding Unicom’s vs CTAF’s.  I’m an Alaska pilot and I also have some time in Eastern Washington, Oregon and Western Idaho. When I was getting my lessons in that region […]

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ATC is a Customer Service Organization.

April 3, 2016

Confession: Selling a house this month + flying a full schedule = not enough time to produce a Radar Contact Show. Over the next couple of days, I’m going to release a series of articles that will eventually be combined into a single Radar Contact Show. Today’s article will change how you view and work with ATC. […]

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What ATC’s ‘Make Closed Traffic’ Clearance Means

February 27, 2016

“Cessna 9130 Delta, Pensasoda Tower, make right closed traffic. Runway 11, cleared for takeoff.” What has ATC just authorized you to do? More importantly, what has ATC not authorized you to do? The answers are not as straight-forward as you would think. You have declared an emergency with ATC. Then, it occurs to you. You […]

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Radar Contact Preview: Cleared to Land

February 3, 2016

Here’s your challenge. Where does the Aeronautical Information Manual, or the J.O. 7110.65 (Air Traffic Control) specifically say you must receive a “cleared to land” from Tower before landing? I’ll have a complete discussion of the topic, including words from air traffic controllers in the next edition of the Radar Contact Show. On a related […]

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We’d Be Thrilled If You Simply Used Your Call Sign!

January 18, 2016

I’ve spent a lot of time at this website talking to you about how to format your call sign when transmitting on the radio. While focusing on tiny details, I failed to recognize the bigger problem. Many pilots do not even use their call sign when talking to ATC. Time to slay that dragon. There […]

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Air Traffic Control Tips, Goodies, and Presents

December 23, 2015

Merry Christmas, Happy Hannukah, or if you prefer, Seasonally Adjusted Greetings. I come bearing gifts of good cheer, ATC tips, techniques, and other goodies. Normally, I’d tell you what’s in store for this edition of Radar Contact. Instead, slip off the ribbon, tear away the wrapping paper and look inside. Show Notes: Rudolf is fully […]

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