Coming Up in Radar Contact

Next Radar Contact Show, “Mistakes Happen”. We all make mistakes when transmitting on the radio, even pilots like me with decades of experience.

doh

Last night, flying from Nagoya, Japan to Honolulu, I got mentally out of synch with the person at the other end of the radio. I made several transmissions that had no connection to what the operator was asking for. We eventually sorted it out, but not before my co-conspirator in the cockpit had a good laugh at my clown show.

At first I was embarrassed by my apparent incompetence. Then, after I examined all of the extenuating circumstances, I cut myself some slack. Mistakes happen on the radio. As long as you recognize them and correct immediately, there’s no need to beat yourself up for an error. I’ll get deeper into the how’s and why’s of this in the next Radar Contact Show.

We’ll also cover the transition from VFR flight following with an enroute center to talking to an airport control tower.

And

What happens when ATC directs you to change to a non-working frequency? Not much. I’ll explain. See you soon.

Aloha,*

Jeff

*I’ve moved to the Big Island of Hawaii.

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